Your vision may change with age.  You may need more light to see.  It may get harder to tell some colors apart.  You may have a harder time seeing close up.  It may be harder to adjust your eyes to the dark.  But there are ways to keep your eyes healthy.

Visit an eye doctor regularly.  Below is the recommended eye exam frequency.

Patient Age Exam Interval
Asymptomatic/ Risk-Free                    At Risk                 
18 to 60 years Every two years Every one to two years or as recommended
61 and older Annually Annually or as recommended

 

The following eye diseases can cause serious loss of vision if not found and treated early:

Diabetic Retinopathy

Glaucoma is an eye disease that causes loss of sight by damaging the optic nerve of the eye and affects peripheral vision. It is often called "the sneak thief of sight” because people usually do not notice any signs of the disease until they have already lost significant vision. Half of people with glaucoma don’t know they have it.

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Cataract

A cataract is a clouding of the eye's lens, which blocks or changes the passage of light into the eye. Vision may become blurry or dim because the cataract stops light from properly passing through to the retina. More than half of all Americans have cataracts by the time they are 80 years old.

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Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration is a disease that affects the macula, the central part of the retina, causing central vision to become blurry or wavy. Macular degeneration can also cause a blind spot in the central vision.

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Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes that can affect almost anyone with diabetes. Retinal blood vessels can break down, leak or become blocked - affecting and impairing vision over time.

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